History on the Daily

History on the Daily

Delivering you a daily dose of history

peashooter85:

An ornate wheellock pistol belonging to a guard of King Christian II of Saxony.  Circa 1610.

(Source: invaluable.com)

Emperors, Kings, Counts, and the Most Important Cannon in European History

During his lifetime, Charles IV drew into his person enormous amounts of power not seen in the Holy Roman Empire since the time of Frederick II Hohenstaufen. As well as being Emperor, he was the king of Bohemia, king of Italy, king of Burgundy, Count of Luxembourg, and Margrave and Elector of Brandenburg. Upon his death, all of his titles went to his son Wenceslaus, except the Margraviate of Brandenburg, which went to his younger son Sigismund along with the title of Elector. 

Four years later, Sigismund’s wife, Mary, became king (not queen) of Hungary and he became her co-ruler, though in reality he was to be the true monarch. Sigismund pawned Brandenburg to his cousin Jobst, already the Margrave of Moravia and duke of the new Duchy of Luxembourg, for money to keep his unstable throne. Nine years of tribulation follow, but Sigismund was finally able to sit secure as king of Hungary. His wife Mary died in 1395 in a riding accident while heavily pregnant. 

Meanwhile in Germany, the unpopular Wenceslaus was deposed as King of the Romans by Rupert, the Elector Palatine, in 1400. Rupert, now King of Germany, ruled for ten years, but like his predecessor was never able to secure the title of Emperor. Rupert lacked real support in the Empire and failed to achieve lasting peace, though he kept his throne due to the laziness of Wenceslaus at reclaiming it.

When Rupert died in 1410, Jobst was elected as King of Germany by four of the imperial electors, with three supporting Sigismund. Sigismund disputed Jobst’s claim to Brandenburg and sent his loyal friend and ally Frederick Hohenzollern, Burgrave of Nuremberg, to represent him at the imperial election. Jobst’s mysterious death in 1411 removed all problems for Sigismund, who was duly elected King of Germany and became the most powerful sovereign in the west. Sigismund would make his way to Rome to be crowned Holy Roman Emperor in 1433, just four years before his death.

But what of Frederick? For all his services in war and peace, Frederick was given the Margraviate of Brandenburg along with the Electorate, with one stroke making the Hohenzollerns one of the most important and powerful families in Germany. The Brandenburgian nobles were not pleased and it took Frederick years to crush their rebellions. And crush them he did, borrowing Faule Grete from the Teutonic Order. The cannon, almost 5 tons in weight and capable of firing a ball 50 cm in diameter, brought the rebels to heel in weeks. Firmly established, the House of Hohenzollern would rule Brandenburg for the next 500 years.

Pictures, top row, left to right- Charles IV, Charles’ Bohemian holdings

Middle: Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Hungary

Bottom: Jobst of Moravia, Frederick I Elector of Brandenburg

art-of-swords:

Katar Dagger

  • Dated: 17th–18th century
  • Place of Origin: Thanjavur
  • Culture: South Indian, Thanjavur
  • Medium: steel

An odd, yet very beautiful variation of a Katar dagger with an European blade.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

historiandaily:

"In years to come it will be a great thing for a man to be able to say: ‘I fought at Arnhem’." -General Montgomery
September 17, 1944- Allied paratroopers land in the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden, in an attempt to drive the German out and penetrate into Germany itself. Thinking they were going to be fighting old men and new recruits, the soldiers found themselves fighting crack Waffen-SS panzer corps. Though initially successful, the Allies ultimately failed in the operation.
Picture- Parachutes open overhead as waves of paratroops land in Holland during operations by the 1st Allied Airborne Army. September 1944, Government archives

historiandaily:

"In years to come it will be a great thing for a man to be able to say: ‘I fought at Arnhem’." -General Montgomery

September 17, 1944- Allied paratroopers land in the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden, in an attempt to drive the German out and penetrate into Germany itself. Thinking they were going to be fighting old men and new recruits, the soldiers found themselves fighting crack Waffen-SS panzer corps. Though initially successful, the Allies ultimately failed in the operation.

Picture- Parachutes open overhead as waves of paratroops land in Holland during operations by the 1st Allied Airborne Army. September 1944, Government archives

historiandaily:

"We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America."
September 17, 1787- The Constitution of the United States is signed in Philadelphia.
Picture- Page one of the original copy of the Constitution.

historiandaily:

"We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America."

September 17, 1787- The Constitution of the United States is signed in Philadelphia.

Picture- Page one of the original copy of the Constitution.

historiandaily:

"You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden." -Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount.
September 17, 1630- The City of Boston is founded in the colony of Massachusetts. The puritan settlers believed the community had made a contract with God and was the “City on the Hill”.
Picture- Skyline of modern day Boston, MA, Henry Han, 2011

historiandaily:

"You are the light of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden." -Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount.

September 17, 1630- The City of Boston is founded in the colony of Massachusetts. The puritan settlers believed the community had made a contract with God and was the “City on the Hill”.

Picture- Skyline of modern day Boston, MA, Henry Han, 2011

breathtakingdestinations:

Mont Saint-Michel - France (by Christopher Sherman)
breathtakingdestinations:

Moscow - Russia (by Dmitriy Fomin) 

mingsonjia:

告庄西双景 (九塔十二寨)

Gaozhuang Pagoda, Xishuangbanna, China (source: , 2)

(via spreadingsassyaroundtheworld)

peashooter85:

The Hungarian Danuvia 35M/43M Submachine Gun,

One of the lesser known and unique submachine guns of the war was the Danuvia series created by Hungary and used during World War II.  At the beginning of World War II, Hungary was an Axis power allied with Germany and Italy. As a result, the original first model, the 35M, was designed after the Italian Beretta Model 38/42.  However the 35M differed in two main ways.  First, the 35M was exceptionally large for a submachine gun.  This was because unlike many German and Italian submachine guns of the time, the 35M was not chambered for the (mm Luger (9X19mm) cartridge, but instead chambered for the large and power 9mm Mauser Export (9X25mm) cartridge.  Thus the 35M was closer in function to a carbine or light rifle than a submachine gun.  Utilizing a 40 round detachable magazine, the 35M could fire a heavy spray of powerful lead at a rate of 750 rounds per minute.  

The 35M was equipped with a traditional solid wooden stock much like Beretta’s submachine guns.  In 1943, the design was updated with a metal folding stock and wooden pistol grip inspired by the German MP-40 design.  The new design was designated the Danuvia 43M.  Another model, with a folding wooden stock was also produced called the 35M/A.

During World War II, the Danuvia design was very popular among Hungarian soldiers.  Perhaps its strongest attribute was its toughness, being able to fire despite being caked in mud and exposed to subzero temperatures.  This was fortunate since Hungarian forces would play a major role in the Eastern Front against the Soviet Union, often suffering heavy casualties.  One downside of the Danuvia design was its ammunition, which was rare and only produced by a few factories in Germany.

By the final weeks of the war, Hungary was almost completely occupied by the Soviet Red Army.  After the war, the Kingdom of Hungary was reorganized into a communist state, and forced to become a Soviet satellite state during the Cold War.  The Danuvia 35M and 43M continued to be used by the Hungarian Army up to the 1950’s, but was eventually phased and replaced with the Russian PPPSh-41.  Between 1935 and 1945, 8,000 - 10,000 Danuvia model submachine guns were produced.

(Source: Wikipedia)